What is a binary star?

 

A binary star consists of two stars that are so close to each other in the sky that, seen from Earth, they are only a small angular distance apart. Often it also appears as if it is only one star. Binary stars form a physical unit and are gravitatively coupled to each other, so they orbit a common center of gravity. The orbital times amount to a period of some days up to millennia. The velocities and the distance to each other change with the rhythm of the orbit time.

Which binary stars are there?

A "real" physical binary star consists of two gravitationally connected single stars. In most cases, the binary system has already formed during the development of the single stars. Optical binary stars have very different distances to Earth, but seem to be very close to each other for observers. A known optical binary star is the pair in the constellation Centaurus, α and β Centauri. In addition to these two categories, there are also the geometric binary stars. They are spatially very close to each other and describe a common orbit around their center of gravity due to their high relative velocities.

Naming a binary star

To Name a Binary Star is a very special gift. The connection of the two single stars symbolizes the magical bond of a unique relationship between two people. They circle around each other and stay together for eternity.